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So, this picture was taken during the march led by Jumaane Williams, our public advocate, and we met up at Brooklyn Borough Hall. There, we listened to various speakers - like different politicians and community activists - heard their stories and perspectives. And then afterwards, we were rallied up by Jumaane Williams, and we marched peacefully across the Brooklyn Bridge.

And about halfway through, we stopped and had a moment of silence. Then we continued on to City Hall where we heard the stories of people who lost love ones to police violence. And that was a really, really powerful event.

And, honestly, this whole thing - this whole march that was put together... I've never experienced anything like it before. But while I was there, I really felt the importance of, not only marching alongside everyone, but documenting the events as well because I really think it's important for us to tell our own stories.

So, the picture that's on display was actually taken while I was walking. And, naturally, during a march, you can't really see the faces of the signs of the people in front of you. So, I really wanted to capture a different perspective, so I had a friend that I was with guide me as I walked backwards to take different pictures.

So, I chose this picture specifically because I feel that this entire movement would not have happened - it would not have been possible - without all of their tragic stories. So, I think it's important for us to honor them and remember them because I know for people who may not be so strongly affected by the things that happened... it may be easy to forget them. But [it's] kind of a message to say, "No. Remember these people, and remember the tragedies that happened."

And I also chose this picture to protect the anonymity of the protesters. You can see there's no one that has their face easily identifiable: they're wearing caps, glasses, masks, so... I wanted to reduce any possible chance of retaliation against anyone that was protesting.

Brooklyn, New York - Jun 09, 2020

Xola Thompson

Xola Thompson
Xola Thompson
Xola Thompson
Jun 9, 2020
Brooklyn, New York

Xola Thompson

So, this picture was taken during the march led by Jumaane Williams, our public advocate, and we met up at Brooklyn Borough Hall. There, we listened to various speakers - like different politicians and community activists - heard their stories and perspectives. And then afterwards, we were rallied up by Jumaane Williams, and we marched peacefully across the Brooklyn Bridge.

And about halfway through, we stopped and had a moment of silence. Then we continued on to City Hall where we heard the stories of people who lost love ones to police violence. And that was a really, really powerful event.

And, honestly, this whole thing - this whole march that was put together... I've never experienced anything like it before. But while I was there, I really felt the importance of, not only marching alongside everyone, but documenting the events as well because I really think it's important for us to tell our own stories.

So, the picture that's on display was actually taken while I was walking. And, naturally, during a march, you can't really see the faces of the signs of the people in front of you. So, I really wanted to capture a different perspective, so I had a friend that I was with guide me as I walked backwards to take different pictures.

So, I chose this picture specifically because I feel that this entire movement would not have happened - it would not have been possible - without all of their tragic stories. So, I think it's important for us to honor them and remember them because I know for people who may not be so strongly affected by the things that happened... it may be easy to forget them. But [it's] kind of a message to say, "No. Remember these people, and remember the tragedies that happened."

And I also chose this picture to protect the anonymity of the protesters. You can see there's no one that has their face easily identifiable: they're wearing caps, glasses, masks, so... I wanted to reduce any possible chance of retaliation against anyone that was protesting.

So, this picture was taken during the march led by Jumaane Williams, our public advocate, and we met up at Brooklyn Borough Hall. There, we listened to various speakers - like different politicians and community activists - heard their stories and perspectives. And then afterwards, we were rallied up by Jumaane Williams, and we marched peacefully across the Brooklyn Bridge.

And about halfway through, we stopped and had a moment of silence. Then we continued on to City Hall where we heard the stories of people who lost love ones to police violence. And that was a really, really powerful event.

And, honestly, this whole thing - this whole march that was put together... I've never experienced anything like it before. But while I was there, I really felt the importance of, not only marching alongside everyone, but documenting the events as well because I really think it's important for us to tell our own stories.

So, the picture that's on display was actually taken while I was walking. And, naturally, during a march, you can't really see the faces of the signs of the people in front of you. So, I really wanted to capture a different perspective, so I had a friend that I was with guide me as I walked backwards to take different pictures.

So, I chose this picture specifically because I feel that this entire movement would not have happened - it would not have been possible - without all of their tragic stories. So, I think it's important for us to honor them and remember them because I know for people who may not be so strongly affected by the things that happened... it may be easy to forget them. But [it's] kind of a message to say, "No. Remember these people, and remember the tragedies that happened."

And I also chose this picture to protect the anonymity of the protesters. You can see there's no one that has their face easily identifiable: they're wearing caps, glasses, masks, so... I wanted to reduce any possible chance of retaliation against anyone that was protesting.

Brooklyn, New York - Jun 09, 2020
Xola Thompson

So, this picture was taken during the march led by Jumaane Williams, our public advocate, and we met up at Brooklyn Borough Hall. There, we listened to various speakers - like different politicians and community activists - heard their stories and perspectives. And then afterwards, we were rallied up by Jumaane Williams, and we marched peacefully across the Brooklyn Bridge.

And about halfway through, we stopped and had a moment of silence. Then we continued on to City Hall where we heard the stories of people who lost love ones to police violence. And that was a really, really powerful event.

And, honestly, this whole thing - this whole march that was put together... I've never experienced anything like it before. But while I was there, I really felt the importance of, not only marching alongside everyone, but documenting the events as well because I really think it's important for us to tell our own stories.

So, the picture that's on display was actually taken while I was walking. And, naturally, during a march, you can't really see the faces of the signs of the people in front of you. So, I really wanted to capture a different perspective, so I had a friend that I was with guide me as I walked backwards to take different pictures.

So, I chose this picture specifically because I feel that this entire movement would not have happened - it would not have been possible - without all of their tragic stories. So, I think it's important for us to honor them and remember them because I know for people who may not be so strongly affected by the things that happened... it may be easy to forget them. But [it's] kind of a message to say, "No. Remember these people, and remember the tragedies that happened."

And I also chose this picture to protect the anonymity of the protesters. You can see there's no one that has their face easily identifiable: they're wearing caps, glasses, masks, so... I wanted to reduce any possible chance of retaliation against anyone that was protesting.

Jun 9, 2020

Brooklyn, New York

Xola Thompson
Xola Thompson
Xola Thompson
Jun 9, 2020
Brooklyn, New York
Xola Thompson

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